Humanure


Nan's Nook : Archives : Misc Tek : OGBDLichentek : Other Dung Teks
Posted by: MTech2 Aug 19 03, 03:28 PM GMT
I've seen a couple posts about using human waste as an alternative to horse manure.....well your dream has come true. Here is a guide for turning human waste into a compost that might be suitable for mushroom cultivation.

http://www.weblife.org/humanure/default.html

Posted by: ShroomZilla Aug 19 03, 03:59 PM GMT
bleah.gif

I hate this topic, comes up like 2 or 3 times a year across every board tongue.gif
Like there ain't enough herbivores running around the planet smile.gif

Posted by: maryxmas Aug 19 03, 04:18 PM GMT
it came up like 3 weeks ago

people are so lazy, just drive to the nearest farm damn it


xmas

Posted by: 420ghost Aug 19 03, 04:20 PM GMT
Is horse manure that expensive? Some of you guys will do anything to save a buck! laugh.gif

Posted by: maryxmas Aug 19 03, 06:15 PM GMT
i get my horse shit for free from a local stable

tell them is to fertilize my dear old grandmas turnip garden

xmas

Posted by: Nanook Aug 19 03, 07:34 PM GMT
Cubies do not fruit on omnivore manure...

It must be manure from an herbivore. And a human eating a vegetarian diet does not count wink.gif

Waste of time, maybe you could use a little as an additive, but not for a substrate base tongue.gif

Posted by: czen Aug 19 03, 08:38 PM GMT
QUOTE (Nanook @ Aug 19 03, 07:34 PM GMT)
It must be manure from an herbivore.  And a human eating a vegetarian diet does not count wink.gif

I guess that means I can quit eating the birdseed, huh? biggrin.gif

Posted by: Dr. Bombay Aug 19 03, 08:47 PM GMT
As always on this topic I feel obliged to point out that several human diseases can be transmitted through human poo.
You got your hepatitis, you got your salmonella, you got your enterotoxogenic ecoli, you got others you dont want.

Human poo is for toilet flushes, not shroom flushes.

Posted by: spawnbag Aug 19 03, 08:55 PM GMT
QUOTE
Human poo is for toilet flushes, not shroom flushes.


You said it all Doc. laugh.gif laugh.gif

Posted by: MTech2 Aug 19 03, 10:33 PM GMT
OK....I started this thread as a joke. However, I started reading this E-book and there are actually a lot of good ideas held within. This is a book on composting not taking straight human feces and throwing it in your sterilite container. Take a few minutes to check it out.

Here are a couple of selected quotes from the reading:

"Humanure is a little bit different. It shouldnít simply be flung around in a fresh and repulsive state. It should undergo a process of bacterial digestion first, usually known as composting, in order to destroy possible pathogens. This is the missing link in the human nutrient recycling process."

"Raw humanure carries with it a significant potential for danger in the form of disease pathogens. These diseases, such as intestinal parasites, hepatitis, cholera, and typhoid are destroyed by composting, either when the retention time is adequate in a low temperature compost pile (usually considered to be two years) or when the composting process generates internal, biological heat (which can kill pathogens in a matter of minutes). Raw applications of humanure to fields, on the other hand, are not hygienically safe and can assist in the spread of various diseases."

"Properly composted humanure yields a rich, loamy, pleasant-smelling, hygienically safe soil-building material.Composting also completely converts the humanure into a new, benign, pleasant-smelling, and beneficial substance called humus, which is then returned to the soil to enrich it and enhance plant growth. "

"Incidentally, all animal manures benefit from composting, as todayís farmers are now discovering. Compost doesnít leach like raw manures do. Instead, it helps hold nutrients in soil systems. Composted manures also reduce plant disease and insect damage and allow for better nutrient management on farms. In fact, two tons of compost will yield far more benefits than five tons of manure."

"To compost means to convert organic material ultimately into soil or, more accurately, humus. Humus is a brown or black substance resulting from the decay of organic animal or vegetable refuse. It is a stable material that does not attract insects or nuisance animals. It can be handled and stored if necessary with no problem, and it is beneficial to the growth of plants. Humus holds moisture, and therefore increases the soilís capacity to absorb and hold water. Compost is said to hold nine times its weight in water (900%), as compared to sand which only holds 2%, and clay 20%."

"Compost also adds slow-release nutrients essential for plant growth, creates air spaces in soil, helps balance the soil pH, darkens the soil (thereby helping it absorb heat), and supports microbial populations that add life to the soil. Nutrients such as nitrogen in compost are slowly released throughout the growing season, making them less susceptible to loss by leaching than the more soluble chemical fertilizers.7 Organic matter from compost enables the soil to immobilize and degrade pesticides, nitrates, phosphorous, and other things that can become pollutants. Compost binds pollutants in soil systems, reducing their leachability and absorption by plants."

Posted by: Malformed Aug 19 03, 10:42 PM GMT
These diseases, such as intestinal parasites, hepatitis, cholera, and typhoid are destroyed by composting

yea... maybe in the right conditions.
are you going to test the compost for disease every time you decide to scoop some into your garden?

no... i still dont think its a good idea.
the benifits do not outweigh the risks.

laugh.gif

Posted by: Nanook Aug 19 03, 10:49 PM GMT
The chemistry is still not the best for shroom...

Herbivore.....

Posted by: Zoom Aug 19 03, 10:50 PM GMT
QUOTE (Malformed @ Aug 19 03, 10:42 PM GMT)
These diseases, such as intestinal parasites, hepatitis, cholera, and typhoid are destroyed by composting

yea... maybe in the right conditions.
are you going to test the compost for disease every time you decide to scoop some into your garden?

no... i still dont think its a good idea.
the benifits do not outweigh the risks.

laugh.gif

There are some things I'l never try, even if they doubled foaf's yield. laugh.gif



PS Do you recommend saving your own or using mass humanure for a good variety of nutritous substances to grow your shrooms in? You know some people don't like corn! laugh.gif laugh.gif

Posted by: MTech2 Aug 19 03, 11:47 PM GMT
Like I said, I posted this as a joke and have no intention on doing this. However, I am just saying one should READ the article as it has some interesting information (I actually did not read it until after I had posted the link). It also addressess some of the safety concerns I had and as to the viability of the entire process.

I had first heard about this site on a talkshow that was speaking on the topic of recycling, conservation, current state of our ecology, etc. This website was brought up and discussed, in some length, as to the benefits and the safety of this kind of composting.

It explains the correct conditions for proper composting of human waste. There are actually plenty of people (cultures) who have been doing this for thousands of years. As well as quite a few here in the US. ( I believe we would call them the fruitcakes)

I am not advocating the use of this as some fantastic shroom fruiting elixir. I'm saying it is a good read with interesting viewpoints on this science as well as (if you can believe) life, religion, and our symbiotic relationship with nature. It also speaks a great deal of composting in general.


Note:He has actually taken samples of his compost in for testing (over the past 20 years) and has yet to come up with a positive for any pathogens in the compost or in his body.

READ IT and then tell me what you think!!

I never thought I would be sitting here writing about shit for an hour.....I'm on time and 1/2 so....what the hell. Oh yeah I love you guys.....Who else could I sit around and talk to about human excrement for hours on end???


Posted by: Nanook Aug 20 03, 01:07 AM GMT
Dude no offense...

Composted human crap is great fertilizer. But it does not grow shrooms (proven fact)... This is a quality, tek site, dedicated to shroom culture (this forum anyway).

Your "Joke" was not funny, we take tek very seriously here (have you picked up on that yet?)... Plus, somebody comes along every 2-3 weeks and throws this same topic up...

Now your "joke" is going to have to be archived at some point, so the next joker that comes along does not take the forum for another ride to the outhouse.

It's great compost for tree farms, and sod crops... Not good for shrooms, and a tired and threadbare topic in the shroom forum wink.gif

No offense... Just the way it is smile.gif

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