The Beatles - Anthology 1


"Anthology 1" sleeve

Release date: 21 November 1995
Apple PCSP 727 (mono and stereo)

Free As A Bird
Speech: John Lennon
That'll Be The Day (performed by The Quarrymen, 1958)
In Spite Of All The Danger (performed by The Quarrymen, 1958)
Speech: Paul McCartney
Hallelujah, I Love Her So
You'll Be Mine
Cayenne
Speech: Paul McCartney
My Bonnie (with Tony Sheridan, German intro)
Ain't She Sweet (1961 version)
Cry For A Shadow
Speech: John Lennon
Speech: Brian Epstein
Searchin' (Decca Audition)
Three Cool Cats (Decca Audition)
The Sheik Of Araby (Decca Audition)
Like Dreamers Do (Decca Audition)
Hello Little Girl (Decca Audition)
Speech: Brian Epstein
Besame Mucho (EMI Audition)
Love Me Do (with Pete Best, EMI Audition)
How Do You Do It
Please Please Me (earliest available take)
One After 909 (sequence, takes 3, 4 and the beginning of take 5)
One After 909 (complete, takes 4 and 5)
Lend Me Your Comb (live at the BBC)
I'll Get You (live at the Sunday Night At The London Palladium show)
Speech: John Lennon
I Saw Her Standing There (live at the Beatles show at Sveriges Radio)
From Me To You (live at the Beatles show at Sveriges Radio)
Money (That's What I Want) (live at the Beatles show at Sveriges Radio)
You Really Got A Hold On Me (live at the Beatles show at Sveriges Radio)
Roll Over Beethoven (live at the Beatles show at Sveriges Radio)
She Loves You (live at the 1963 Royal Command Performance)
Till There Was You (live at the 1963 Royal Command Performance)
Twist And Shout (live at the 1963 Royal Command Performance)
This Boy (live at the Morecambe And Wise Show)
I Want To Hold Your Hand (live at the Morecambe And Wise Show)
Speech: Eric Morecambe and Ernie Wise
Moonlight Bay (live at the Morecambe And Wise Show)
Can't Buy Me Love (takes 1 and 2)
All My Loving (live at the Ed Sullivan Show)
You Can't Do That (take 6)
And I Love Her (take 2)
A Hard Day's Night (take 1)
I Wanna Be Your Man (live at the Around The Beatles Show)
Long Tall Sally (live at the Around The Beatles Show)
Boys (live at the Around The Beatles Show)
Shout (live at the Around The Beatles Show)
I'll Be Back (take 2)
I'll Be Back (take 3)
You Know What To Do (demo)
No Reply (demo)
Mr. Moonlight (takes 1 and 4)
Leave My Kitten Alone (take 5)
No Reply (take 2)
Eight Days A Week (sequence, takes 1, 2 and 4)
Eight Days A Week (complete, take 5)
Medley: Kansas City/Hey-Hey-Hey-Hey! (take 2)


The Twentieth Century's greatest romance or 'just a band that made it very very big'? The latter view is John's, in hard- hatted post-Beatles myth-demolitionmode; the former is mine, rose-coloured, with long and loving hindsight.

Of course John has the real weight, as one of the 'four guys' of Track 2 on Record 1: I speak only as a devotee of Arnold Bennett's Card, whose Great Cause was "cheering us all up". The Beatles certainly gave more cheer than almost anyone else this century, and if that isn't a great romance, then Gold didn't make little pink rose.

The records, film and book of the story are on their way, some of it already in your hands, and millions of fans old and new will be, again, amazed.

The story began in Harold Macmillan's 'never had it so good' 50's Britain. It should be fiction: four teenagers with no more that eight O'levels between them, running and biking and busing and busking all over Liverpool in search of new chords and old guitars, a half-decent drum kit and any gig at all.

They were determined to amount to something - in George's words "we just had this amazing inner feeling of: 'We're going to do it'. I don't know why ... we were just cocky" - and make a record (in Ringo's words "You'd kill for that bit of plastic") and make some money and have a laugh and a shout. That would do to be going on with.

Six years later, they were the four most famous and musical young men on earth, the best dressed and on a good day quite the most captivating people anyone could remember. The narrative that began when Paul met John and clicked at a garden fete in leafy Liverpool, and ended in high dudgeon in high-end London, is so far-fetched that it needs the power of a song punctuating every page to remind you with a joyous jolt that it was all true.

We didn't dream it ... though it came out of John's dream of the "man on a flaming pie" who said: "You are Beatles with an 'A'" It did all happen. The whole wonderful thing did happen, a long time ago, on the Mersey, on the Elbe, by the Thames and the Hundson River. This album is the first of the bunch, the beginning of the latest incarnation. Amazing and marvellous and, nearly forty years on, forever young.

- Derek Taylor


Free As A Bird
(Original composition by John Lennon; Beatles version by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr)


Recorded New York, circa 1977, and Sussex, England, February/March 1994
Producers John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, Jeff Lynne
Engineer Geoff Emerick

This recording brings together John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr.

A piece of music that he never completed, Free As A Bird was recorded in demo form by John Lennon at his home in New York, circa 1977. In early 1994, that original tape was entrusted to the careful attention of Paul, George and Ringo for the first "Beatles" sessions since 1970.

"We took the attitude that John had gone on holiday, saying 'I finished all the tracks except this one but I leave it to you guys to finish it off,'" Paul McCartney has since said, "and once we agreed to take that attitude it gave us a lot of freedom."

In terms of composition, that freedom resulted in further development of the melody and lyric. In recording terms, John's original mono cassette has been expanded into analogue 48-track form, his voice and piano augmented by new vocals from Paul, Ringo and George, Ringo's drums, George's and Paul's acoustic guitars, Paul's bass guitar, George's lead guitar and slide solo, and Paul's piano, which doubles with John's original. And there are one or two instrumental surprises...

The outcome is an elevation of the simply beauty of John's original demo to a much higher level. Jeff Lynne, co-producer of the recording, modestly remarks, "It was tricky, but I think we've pulled it off."

 

"We were four guys ... that's all"
John Lennon speaking to Jann Wenner of Rolling Stone, 8 December 1970, New York City.
Special thanks to Jann Wenner & Rolling Stone Magazine.
© 1970 Jann Wenner all rights reserved

 

That'll Be The Day (performed by The Quarrymen, 1958)
(Allison/Holly/Petty)
In Spite Of All The Danger (performed by The Quarrymen, 1958)
(Paul McCartney, George Harrison)


Recorded Phillips Sound Recording Service, Liverpool, 1958
Engineer Percy F Phillips

Running an electrical goods shop in Liverpool wasn't enough for Percy Phillips, and being 60 certainly wasn't going to stop him. So in 1955, spurred by the local interest in country and western music, Phillips spent 400 on a portable tape recorder and portable disc cutting machine, microphones and a four-way mixer, which were installed in the middle living-room of his Victorian terraced house at number 38 Kensington, a major thoroughfare located a mile beyond Liverpool city center.

Sparse it may have been but Phillips' recording facility was efficient. Having arrived for their appointment customers would sit in a waiting area and, when prompted, move into the living-room, face up to the microphones and perform, live. While trams rattled along Kensington - their noise was deadened by a heavy curtain over the studio door - Percy Philllips would first commit the performance to tape and then, provided that the Artiste was not distressed with the result, immediately transfer this to a shellac disc, wiping over the tape next time someone used the studio.

Word of Pillips' facility soon spread, and as skiffle and then beat music took hold so it began to attract a number of Liverpool's younger musicians, eager to commit their sound to disc and be able to announce that they had "made a record". Having travelled with their instruments from the south end if the city, a quintet called the Quarrymen - John Lennon, Paul McCarntey and George Harrison, who all played guitars, John Lowe who played the piano, and Colin Hanton the drummer - turned up at Phillips Sound Recording Service one day in the spring or summer of 1958. A short while later, having parted company with 17s 6d [88p], the five Quarrymen left 38 Kensington passing among them the cherished fruit of their debut recording session: a very-breakable 78rpm record, ten-inches in diameter. The disc's labels clearly instructed "Play with a light-weight pick-up" ... but bore no mention of the words Quarrymen, and certainly not Beatles, a name they wouldn't adopt for another two years.

On one side of the disc was That'll Be The Day, homage to Buddy Holly and the Crickets, featuring John Lennon's lead vocal with Paul McCartney providing the high harmonies. On the other side was In Spite Of All The Danger, co-written by Paul McCartney and George Harrison, but, again, with John Lennon singing lead.

Colin Hanton (whose membership of the Quarrymen pre-dated both Paul's and George's) and John Lowe (who was recruited principally because he could play Jerry Lee Lewis's exacting arpeggio part in Mean Woman Blues) left soon after the band's one and only recording session, leaving the nucleus, Lennon, McCartney and Harrison, to aim for fame.

 

"Sometimes I'd borrow ... those still exist"
Paul McCartney speaking to Mark Lewishon, 3 November 1994, London.

 

Hallelujah, I Love Her So
(Charles)
You'll Be Mine
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)
Cayenne
(Paul McCartney)


Recorded Liverpool, 1960

Three examples of the early Beatles' developing sound, recorded in rehearsal at Paul McCartney's home in Liverpool. The four guitar line-up - John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Stuart Sutclicffe - suggests that the session dates from the spring or early summer of 1960, when the Beatles were having trouble finding a drummer. Certainly, the tape provides the only known recordings made during bass player Sutcliffe's tenure in the group.

Hallelujah, I Love Her So was first recorded by Ray Charles in 1956 but the clear influence here is Eddie Cochran's cover version. This had been a minor hit on the British singles chart in February 1960, helped there by Paul who bought the record and sings lead on this recording.

You'll Be Mine is a fun number, performed in a manner reminiscent of the Ink Spots, the popular American singing combo. Paul sings the lead vocal and delivers a rousing finale, and John adds a memorably outlandish spoken middle section that embraced the Beatles' collective love for the absurd and, with the phrase "National Health eyeball", his own fondness for word-play.

Cayenne is an instrumental composed by Paul McCartney. A good number of the earliest titles written by either Lennon or McCartney, or both, were instrumentals, written in the late 1950s when tunes without a lyric were prevalent.

 

"First of all ... it didn't do a thing here"
Paul McCartney speaking to Malcolm Threadgill during a hospital radio interview with the Beatles mainly conducted by Monty Lister. Recorded 27 October 1962 backstage at Hulme Hall, Port Sunlight, Cheshire.

 

My Bonnie (with Tony Sheridan, German intro)
(traditional, arranged by Tony Sheridan)
Ain't She Sweet (1961 version)
(Yellen/Ager)
Cry For A Shadow
(George Harrison, John Lennon)


Recorded Friedrich-Ebert-Halle, Hamburg, 22 June 1961
Producer Bert Kaempfert
Engineer Karl Hinze

During the Beatles' second visit to Hamburg, April to July 1961, the group regularly backed an English singer/guitarist, Tony Sheridan, who had gone to play there in the early summer of 1960 and befriended the Beatles' when they first arrived in the city shortly afterwards. On a visit to the Top Ten Club, a music publishing executive was impressed by the Sheridan/Beatles stage combination and so talked to a friend, the orchestra leader and composer Bert Kaempfert, suggesting that Kamepfert consider producing some recording sessions.

One morning, probably 22 June, not long after the Beatles had finished another seven-hour slog in the Top Ten, taxis arrived to take them to the place of recording - not a real studio but Friedrich-Ebert-Halle, a school, where the session took place on stage. The Beatles backed Sheridan on five or six numbers - the main one being a rock rendition of the lullaby My Bonnie Lies Over The Ocean - and then had two more to themselves: Ain't She Sweet and Cry For A Shadow. In August 1961, after the Beatles had returned to Liverpool, Polydor issued My Bonnie as a single, credited to Tony Sheridan and the Beat Brothers, the disc eventually climbing high on a local German chart. Only on the British release (elsewhere, it was only after the group became famous) was the label credit altered to Tony Sheridan and the Beatles.

But My Bonnie was not more than just the Beatles' first appearance on commercial disc: it also brought them to the attention of Brian Epstein...

Tony Sheridan rocked-up the arrangement they called My Bonnie, delivered the spoken-word introduction, sang and played lead guitar. George Harrison played the opening lead guitar passage, Paul McCartney is clearly evident, not only for his bass but also for his background shouts, and John Lennon and drummer Pete Best - who had joined the group's lineup in August 1960 - also played.

Ain't She Sweet did not feature Sheridan, John Lennon singing the lead vocal. A staple of their 1961 stage act, the Beatles usually performed this in the more mellow style of Gene Vincent and his Blue Caps' influential 1956 version. However, when it came to Hamburg audiences, and this recording, the Beatles delivered the song in what John Lennon later described as "a harder version ... more like a march".

Cry For A Shadow is a rare instrumental performance by the Beatles; the composer credit, Harrison-Lennon, was the only such occurrence on disc.

 

"Brian was a beautiful guy ... he presented us well"
John Lennon speaking to David Wigg of the [London] Daily Express and BBC Radio 1 programme Scene And Heard (broadcast November 1971). Interview recorded October 1971 in New York City.

 

"I secured them ... a Beatle drink even then"

Recorded EMI Studios, London, 13 October 1964
Producer George Martin
Engineer Stuart Eltham

Brian Epstein reading an extract from his autobiography A Cellarful Of Noise. He intended to record enough material for an album but the sessions were not completed and the tapes have remained unheard until now.
Special thanks to Queenie Epstein

 

Searchin' (Decca Audition)
(Leiber/Stoller)
Three Cool Cats (Decca Audition)
(Leiber/Stoller)
The Sheik Of Araby (Decca Audition)
(Smith/Wheeler/Snyder)
Like Dreamers Do (Decca Audition)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)
Hello Little Girl (Decca Audition)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)


Recorded Decca Studios, London, 1 January 1962
Producer Mike Smith

Five songs taken from the 15 laid down by the Beatles - John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Pete Best - during their audition for Decca Records. The session took place on New Year's Day 1962, at the company's studio at 165 Broadhurst Gardens in the West Hampstead district of north London. Recorded live, directly on to mono tape, without the opportunity to overdub or remix, the session was overseen by Decca A&R [artistes & repertoire] assistant Mike Smith.

Obtaining for the Beatles a contract with a British recording company was the number one priority that Brian Epstein assigned himself in his role as the new manager of the group. Moreover, in an attempt to underline the Beatles' musical versatility, he personally selected the 15 songs cut at the Decca audition, all of which, to a greater or lesser extent, could be heard if one followed the group's frequent performances around the Merseyside dance halls and rock clubs. Searchin' and Three Cool Cats were certainly major Beatles stage favourties at this time, and both were from the same matrix: comedy numbers written by Leiber-Stoller and first recovered by the American R&B outfit the Coasters, in 1957 and 1958 respectively. For Searchin', Paul supplied the lead vocal, John and George the backing vocal; Three Cool Cats featured George.

The Sheik Of Araby was another big favourite, again with George Harrison delivering the lead vocal. The song was first performed in the stage musical Make It Snappy and the 1940 Hollywood movie Tin Pan Alley, but the Beatles were inspired by a cheeky, chirpy rock and roll version by Joe Brown, consequently their Decca performance had humour to the fore, right from the best-style Arabic mood-setting kick-off through to the humour John-Paul "not arf"s.

By the start of 1962, Lennon and McCartney had been composing music, together or alone, for some five years, often claiming in early interviews to have written "100 original songs" before being noticed. The Beatles recorded very few of these numbers once successful. Like Dreamers Do and Hello Little Girl, to name but two, are early Lennon-McCartney numbers which the Beatles never recorded once signed to EMI, although they were obviously considered strong enough to present to Decca in the New Year's Day audition, not least to prove the boast, rare for the period, that the group could pen their own material. Hello Little Girl was actually the first song written by John Lennon, Like Dreamers Do showed Paul McCartney in hopeful mood, "waiting for the bliss".

Both song did eventually see commercial release. The Fourmost, another Liverpool group managed by Brian Epstein, were given Hello Little Girl in 1963; Like Dreamers Do was recorded by Birmingham band the Applejacks in 1964.

 

"Well, the recording test ... by my artists"

Recorded EMI Studios, London, 13 October 1964
Producer George Martin
Engineer Stuart Eltham

Brian Epstein reading from his autobiography A Cellarful Of Noise.

 

Besame Mucho (EMI Audition)
(Velazquez[music]/Skylar[lyrics])
Love Me Do (with Pete Best, EMI Audition)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)


Recorded EMI Studios, London, 6 June 1962
Producer George Martin
Engineer Norman Smith

Rejection by Decca wounded the Beatles' pride and caused them to fear that they might not succeed in gaining a recording contract. At least Decca granted them an audition: they couldn't even get this far with the other major record companies, many turning them down merely on the basis of the My Bonnie single and the Decca audition tape being hawked around London by an increasingly dispirited Brian Epstein.

EMI, too, or at least certain sections of the company, had also rejected the Beatles - before, by way of a tortuous route, these recordings were brought to the attention of George Martin, A&R man for the organisation's Parlophone label. Exercising the sensible notion "What do I have to lose?" Martin told Epstein that he may as well take a look at the Beatles in person, and so it was arranged that the group would go to London, to EMI's studio at 3 Abbey Road, St. John's Wood, on Wednesday 6 June 1962.

It is likely that the Beatles performed a good number of song from their repertoire during this initial EMI session (the group's only Abbey Road date with drummer Pete Best, before Ringo Starr replaced him in August 1962) but only four - Besame Mucho, Love Me Do, P.S. I Love You and Ask Me Why - were recorded on to tape. None was issued and only two have survived the years; both are being released here for the first time.

Besame Mucho was another great favourite from the Beatles' stage act, and, again, the influential hand of the Coasters was at work - the Beatles had clearly been paying attention to the group's 1960 Besame Mucho single, especially to the B-side's Part 2 version. Adding their own distinctive touch, the Beatles threw in the "Cha-cha-boom!"s for good measure.

The Beatles recorded Love Me Do three times in 1962 - on 6 June, and 4 and 11 September 1962 - on each occasion with a different drummer. The latter two were issued on record, featuring Ringo Starr and session player Andy White respectively, but the initial version, cut with Pete Best, was re-discovered only in 1994. This version of Love Me Do is noticeably slower (and so longer) than the other two, although the tempo dose vary. John Lennon's harmonica opens and punctuates the recording, owing much to the influence of Bruce Channel's harmonica-laced contemporary hit Hey! Baby.

This late addition of harmonica to the arrangement of Love Me Do caused a problem not foreseen by the Beatles in private rehearsal: who would complete the vocal line "love me do" now that John had an instrument in his mouth? George Martin had the solution, promptly handing the line to Paul McCartney. Even though it was his song, Paul's nervousness at being handed such a task during the already never-wracking debut recording session is audible.

 

How Do You Do It
(Murray)


Recorded EMI Studios, London, 4 September 1962
Producer George Martin
Engineer Norman Smith

Although the Beatles' had recorded four songs at EMI on 6 June 1962 none was considered worthy of issue as the first single, so on 4 September John, Paul, George and new drummer Ringo went back to Abbey Road to take part in a second session. One of the two numbers they recorded this day (the other begin Love Me Do) was How Do You Do It, which, in the apparent absence of any stronger Lennon-McCartney material, producer George Martin was insisting would be the A-side of the group's first single.

While it would be true to say that the Beatles were not enthralled with How Do You Do It - they felt that it was being foisted upon them and did not suit their style - they did have the goodwill to learn and then alter the arrangement, making it more appropriate for a beat group sound, and to turn in a decent performance for George Martin ... even if they did then lobby for its rejection, and succeed.

Everyone came up smelling of roses from the episode. How Do You Do It went to number one in the charts for Gerry and the Pacemakers, who utilised the Beatles' re-arrangement for their own recording. Mitch Murray's first published song was an international hit. George Martin won the heart of his new group by permitting them to have their head, and the Beatles themselves, from a position of little strength, were able to remain true to themselves and to John and Paul's wish that the group release only their own compositions as singles, starting with the first, Love My Do.

This, in particular, was to be a pivotal decision.

 

Please Please Me (earliest available take)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)


Recorded EMI Studios, London, 11 September 1962
Producer George Martin
Engineer Norman Smith

One week after recording How Do You Do It the Beatles made a third visit to Abbey Road in what proved to be the final attempt at polishing off their debut single. To this end, George Martin had arranged for Andy White, a session drummer, to occupy the beat seat, which came as quite a shock to the Beatles and especially to Ringo, who had joined the group less than four weeks previously and wondered if this was a sign of things to come. As it happened, this was to be the only occasion that Ringo was replaced in such a fashion.

With so much thought already invested in Love Me Do it took very little time for the Beatles, with White, to complete a third recording. Quickly moving on, they also started and finished a re-make (following the 6 June attempt) of the song which would be issued as its B-side, Lennon-McCartney's PS I Love You, they committed to tape a third number, Please Please Me. Believed wiped, the earliest available recording of the song re-surfaced in 1994 and is being released here for the first time. It varies from the master take in a number of ways, the most obvious being the absence of harmonica, always regarded as the released recording's trademark feature. The lead and harmony vocals, and the drum track, also differ.

 

One After 909 (sequence, takes 3, 4 and the beginning of take 5)
One After 909 (complete, takes 4 and 5)

(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)


Recorded EMI Studios, London, 5 March 1963
Producer George Martin
Engineer Norman Smith

Pre-dating the version on the Let It Be album by six years, this recording sequence of One After 909 was taped toward the end of the session in which the Beatles cut From Me To You and Thank You Girl, the A- and B-sides of their third single. Despite putting down five takes, however, the Beatles failed to achieve an entirely satisfactory recording of One After 909 in this session, leaving the job unfinished and unissued.

The sequence presented here comprises Take 3, which broke down, followed by a short extract of Take 4 before it too broke down, and the beginning of Take 5, which was an edit piece from the guitar solo onwards. Finally, by editing them together, we hear how 4 and 5 could have been made into a master.

The breakdown of Take 3 provides fine aural evidence of the incredibly hectic schedule endured by the Beatles in 1962/63. The finger points to Paul who complains that he doesn't have his plectrum, and the voice of road manager Neil Aspinall is then heard, indicating that Paul didn't instruct him to bring in his suitcase. The previous night the Beatles had been performing at a ballroom in St. Helens, just outside Liverpool. But the morning of the recording session found them 200 miles south, on photographic assignments at EMI house, on the street of London and on the steps outside Abbey Road studio. Then came the important recording session in the afternoon and evening followed by a swift return north for a BBC radio appearance in Manchester the next day, 6 March.

 

Lend Me Your Comb (live at the BBC)
(Twomey/Wise/Weisman)


Recorded BBC Media Vale Studios, London, 2 July 1963
Producer Terry Henebery

The success of Please Please Me and From Me To You gave the Beatles such a rapid ascendancy that, just eleven months after singing with Parlophone, they were offered their own weekly radio series by the BBC - and this at a time when pop music was severely rationed on the nation's airwaves. Pop Goes The Beatles was transmitted in 15 half-hour editions, from 4 June to 24 September 1963, each one featuring music recorded by the group exclusively in the Corporation's studios. Throughout the series, as with their other early BBC broadcasts, the Beatles made a conscious effort to perform the songs that had been the backbone of their former stage act, the period when they performed other people's music more than their own.

In the fifth edition of Pop Goes The Beatles the Beatles performed six songs, four of which - That's All Right Mama, Carol, Soldier Of Love and Clarabella - were included on the multi-platinum 1994 album Live At The BBC. A fifth number, the only extant recording of the group performing Lend Me Your Comb, is released here for the first time. Although not written by Carl Perkins, his influential version was issued in December 1956 on the flip-side of single Glad All Over - another song recorded by the Beatles and issued on Live At The BBC.

 

I'll Get You (live at the Sunday Night At The London Palladium show)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)


Recorded London Palladium, 13 October 1963

Just as the apex of TV entertainment in the USA was once The Ed Sullivan Show, so the British equivalent was Val Parnell's Sunday Night At The London Palladium. Both were broadcast on Sunday evenings from the late 1950s through the 1960s, when, after a quiet and reverential day of rest, viewers were more than ready for an hour of Variety. To be offered an engagement on Sunday Night At The London Palladium was, for most British entertainers, a pinnacle career achievement, and very few ever had it so good.

With She Loves You propelling the Beatles not just to the top of the British singles chart but into the very fabric of the nation in the late summer of 1963, the group were quickly invited on to SNALP. The first of their two appearances went out on 13 October, and they headed a bill that also included the compere Bruce Forsyth with his ever-popular audience-participation game Beat The Clock, American balladeer Brook Benton and the British comic / singer Des O'Connor.

The Beatles treated the viewers at home and the Palladium audience itself to a ten-minute routine distilled from their current stage act and from which I'll Get You (the B-side of She Loves You) is presented here.

 

"We were performers ... in Britain"
John Lennon speaking to Jann Wenner of Rolling Stone, 8 December 1970, New York City.
Special thanks to Jann Wenner & Rolling Stone Magazine.
© 1970 Jann Wenner all rights reserved

 

I Saw Her Standing There (live at the Beatles show at Sveriges Radio)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)
From Me To You (live at the Beatles show at Sveriges Radio)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)
Money (That's I What I Want) (live at the Beatles show at Sveriges Radio)
(Gordy/Bradford)
You Really Got A Hold On Me (live at the Beatles show at Sveriges Radio)
(Robinson)
Roll Over Beethoven (live at the Beatles show at Sveriges Radio)
(Berry)


Recorded Karlaplansstudion, Stockolm, 10 October 1963
Producer Klas Burling
Engineer Hans Westman

Apart from their five trips to Hamburg, all of which occurred before fame came along, the Beatles' first overseas tour was to Sweden, a country in which they achieved popularity almost at the same time as in Britain.

The group made the five of two visits there in October 1963, wherein their first duty was to record an appearance for Sveriges Radio, broadcast on 11 November.

The national network was kindly donating 25 minutes of late-evening P1 channel airtime to the visiting Englishmen and giving them their very own one-shot programme, The Beatles, popgrupp från Liverpool på besök i Stockholm - meaning The Beatles, pop group from Liverpool visiting Stockholm.

Clearly exuberant at playing for the Swedish audience, the Beatles put in a fine performance, and five songs from the seven that were recorded are presented here. The group burst straight into I Saw Her Standing There, following which Paul introduced From Me To You. The three remaining songs would feature on With The Beatles, when issued four weeks later: Money (That's What I Want) was originally recorded in 1959 by Barrett Strong; You Really Got A Hold On Me was a William "Smokey" Robinson number, recorded in 1962 by (as John pointed out to the Swedish audience) his group the Miracles, and Roll Over Beethoven, featuring George's lead vocal and guitar, was first recorded by Chuck Berry in 1956.

 

She Loves You (live at the 1963 Royal Command Performance)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)
Till There Was You (live at the 1963 Royal Command Performance)
(Willson)
Twist And Shout (live at the 1963 Royal Command Performance)
(Russell/Medley)


Recorded Prince of Wales Theatre, London, 4 November 1963

Unabashed stone-the-crows merriment followed the Beatles' televisual triumph on Sunday Night At The London Palladium and the enthusiastic reception on the viewing terrace at London Airport that greeted their return from Sweden. In what was fast becoming a new order passion, these two events were followed by the Beatles' appearance in the 1963 Royal Command Performance (also known as the Royal Variety Show) on 4 November 1963. Not on this scale, not by anyone or anything, neither before nor since, has Britain allowed herself to be so happily consumed as she was in those jolly winter months of 1963/64 when the Beatles were rampant. The Four had become speedily and most emphatically Fab, with a capital F.

To prove the point, were this necessary, ratings indicate that almost 40 per cent of the population tuned in to watch ITV's Sunday 10 November recording of the Royal show, while those without television sets - and there were three million, still - could listen to highlights on "the wireless", broadcast the same evening by the BBC. Certainly, whether they were viewing or listening, it was the Beatles whom everyone was eager to catch because, in the six days between performance and broadcasts, the newspapers had been full of little else.

For the Press at least, it was all good, clean fun. Outside the Prince of Wales Theatre, by Leicester Square, happy, screaming teenagers were being held valiantly in check by rows of arm-linked bobbies, helmets slipping down over determined teeth. Inside, the Beatles were living up to their role as good-time cheeky chappies, with a roguish word here, a sprinkling of impudent wit there, and, of course, already in danger of being overlooked, the music...

The Beatles performed four songs in the Royal Command Performance, three of which are presented here. She Loves You was unquestionably at the heart of Britain's blooming love affair with the group. Released as a single at the end of August, it raced to number one on the BBC's Top 20 within a fortnight and was at the top for five weeks, right through September, not leaving the top three until January 1964, four months after release.

As Paul announced, Till There Was You originated in The Music Man - a stage musical since 1957, with Peggy Lee's 1961 recording proving influential. The Beatles' stage performances of this song often were prefaced with a joke: this time Paul told the audience that it had also been recorded by their "favourite American group, Sophie Tucker".

It was these jokes as much as the music that caused the Beatles' appearance in R&B stomper Twist And Shout, recorded in 1962 by the Isley Brothers whose version inspired the Beatles' cover. By way of a best-selling EP, its inclusion on the Please Please Me album (30 weeks at number one) and TV, radio and stage shows, Twist And Shout had become established as the Beatles' ultimate crowd-pleaser - but before launching into this performance John Lennon hushed the regal gathering and made a request. It was usual for the Beatles to ask audiences to "join in and clap your hands". Now, as he surveyed the glitterati, there was a chance. "For our last number I'd like to ask your help," John challenged. "Would the people in the cheaper seats clap your hands? And the rest of you, if you'll just rattle your jewellery."

 

This Boy (live at the Morecambe And Wise Show)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)
I Want To Hold Your Hand (live at the Morecambe And Wise Show)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)
"Boys, what I was thinking ..."
Moonlight Bay (live at the Morecambe And Wise Show)
(Madden/Wenrich)


Recorded ATV Studios , Borehamwood, 2 December 1963

Three songs from the four performed by the Beatles during an appearance on the British TV comedy series The Morecambe And Wise Show. It was a meeting of two teams at the top, for Eric Morecambe, the jokester, and Ernie Wise, his straight man, were recognised as Britain's favourite comic act, establishing a reputation that lives on beyond Morecambe's death in 1984, a passing that saddened the nation.

This Boy and I Want To Hold Your Hand - the B- and A-sides of the Beatles' fifth single, a widely successful 45 released at the end of November - were performed first, before the Beatles joined Morecambe and Wise for a comedy skit, Eric mistaking the Beatles for the Kaye Sisters (a British singing trio popular in the late 1950s) and calling Ringo "Bongo", and George Harrison describing the Beatles as "the ones with the big fat hairy heads", a parody of Morecambe's perennial joke that Wise had "short fat hairy legs".

The comics and musicians then agreed to join forces for a musical number. Ernie and the Beatles kitted themselves out in boaters and striped jackets to perform Moonlight Bay (sung by Alice Faye in the 1940 movie Tin Pan Alley and by Doris Day in the 1951 film On Moonlight Bay) with piano backing provided by Kenny Powell. Eric, meanwhile, who had rushed off to dress for the performance, returned in a "Beatles" wig and collarless jacket, shouting "yeah yeah yeah", "twist and shout" and (in the manner of Gerry and the Pacemakers' kit) "I like it". The collaboration ended with the Beatles' trademark "ooohhh", underlining the group's willingness to self-mock - a trait that is always appreciated by a British audience.

Asked in 1994 to name his favourite of the many television programmes the Beatles had appeared on, Paul McCartney scarcely hesitated in responding The Morecambe And Wise Show.

 

Can't Buy Me Love (takes 1 and 2)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)


Recorded Pathé Marconi, Paris, 29 January 1964
Producer George Martin
Engineer Norman Smith

A key part of the film A Hard Day's Night, Can't Buy Me Love became the Aside of the Beatles' sixth single in March 1964.

In Paris for a concert season at the Olympia, music-hall, the Beatles taped the basic track and all outtakes of Can't Buy Me Love at the end of a session at EMI's Pathé Marconi studios in which they also recorded German-language versions of I Want To Hold Your Hand and She Loves You. Vocal and guitar overdubs were added to the master, Take 4, back at Abbey Road on 25 February, but the previously unreleased Paris recording of Can't Buy Me Love presented here, all vocals and instruments live, is Take 2 (with the main guitar solo "flown in" from Take 1). Paul's vocal style was more bluesy in these first two rough takes - though it should be recognised that he was not attempting a definitive vocal track - while John and George's backing vocal idea was later dispensed with too.

 

All My Loving (live at the Ed Sullivan Show)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)


Recorded CBS Television Studio, New York, 9 February 1964

The first song from the Beatles' first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show. As Ed introduced the group and Paul struck up his With The Beatles song All My Loving, a revolution in American popular culture occurred. Although this was not the Beatles' debut on US television it was, all the same, the first time most Americans saw them, and it proved to be a record-breaking moment in the history of US TV - the A C Nielsen rating of 23,240,000 viewing homes meant that something like 73 million people tuned in, shattered the previous best figure and remaining the largest American viewing audience for three years.

The show went out live from 8 until 9pm, Eastern Standard Time, on Sunday 9 February 1964, and was networked across the United States by CBS from its Broadway studio in New York City. In the time that it took the Beatles to perform five songs (the other were Till There Was You, She Loves You, I Saw Her Standing There and I Want To Hold Your Hand) they booked themselves a place in American cultural history.

 

You Can't Do That (take 6)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)
And I Love Her (take 2)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)


Recorded EMI Studios, London, 25 February 1964
Producer George Martin
Engineer Norman Smith

Two recordings from the Beatles' session at EMI on 25 February 1964, the first of four productive dates at Abbey Road in the week after the group returned from America but before they began shooting A Hard Day's Night.

The feature-film A Hard Day's Night put the Beatles under real pressure. So that they could mime to them in front of the cameras, all soundtrack songs had to be written and recorded before filming began on 2 March. On this first date the group completed the Paris Take 4 of Can't Buy Me Love, started and finished You Can't Do That and then began work on And I Love Her and I Should Have Known Better.

You Can't Do That was a John Lennon composition ("That's me doing Wilson Pickett," he revealed in a 1980 interview) which, ultimately, was edited out of A Hard Day's Night even though the Beatles filmed a performance for the movie's "TV show" finale. As such, it was switched to the non-soundtrack side of the associated Parlophone album, but was also issued as the B-side of the single Can't Buy Me Love.

The recording featured the combined sound of John Lennon's lead and George Harrison's 12-string guitars - George acquired the instrument in America, and its sound was prevalent throughout there sessions. The master version was Take 9 but the one presented here is Take 6: an attempt at perfecting the basic track while John delivered a guide vocal. It was usual for the Beatles to record with a live (if only guide) vocal until around the time of Revolver in 1966.

And I Love Her is admired and enjoyed as one of Paul McCartney's earliest and warmest ballads, the master recording being the second take of a second remake, from 27 February 1964. Two days earlier, when the Beatles first taped the song, the approach was different. Presented here is the unreleased Take 2 - the first complete run-through - which is not so gentle, featuring the full-group sound of guitars, drums and, unusually, a picked electric guitar.

 

A Hard Day's Night (take 1)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)


Recorded EMI Studios, London, 16 April 1964
Producer George Martin
Engineer Norman Smith

Odd though it may seem, the one A Hard Day's Night song the Beatles did not perform in the movie was the title number. There was a good reason: it was not recorded until a week before shooting was completed, and the film's running-jumping-falling over opening sequence, which it would highlight, had already been shot.

On 16 April 1964, after the Beatles had finished filming for the day, they hopped across to Abbey Road and set about its recording. The job was completed in under three hours, that time including the overdubs added on to Take 9, the last and most satisfying of the basic track and guide vocal takes they had committed to tape. Presented here, however, is the previously unreleased first recorded run-though, Take 1, with numerous vocal and instrumental variations from the master. The crashing guitar chord that distinguished that master version is already in place, but the bridge, later plugged by a piano played by George Martin, was filled here by a guitar solo. The Beatles recognised that Take 1 was never going to be the best take, hence the laughter as the recording began to dissolve, but it captures the essence of the productive yet fun sessions that were typical of this period.

 

I Wanna Be Your Man (live at the Around The Beatles Show)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)
Long Tall Sally (live at the Around The Beatles Show)
(Johnson/Penniman/Blackwell)
Boys (live at the Around The Beatles Show)
(Dixon/Farrell)
Shout (live at the Around The Beatles Show)
(The Isley Brothers)


Recorded IBC Studios, London, 19 April 1964
Producer Jack Good
Engineer Terry Johnson

Working to a schedule that would faze most other, and seems even by their own standards to be extreme, the Beatles recorded a TV special in April 1964, while they were still completing A Hard Day's Night. So called because it presented the group "in the round", in the manner of early Shakespearean productions, Around The Beatles was made and networked in Britain by the London ITV company Rediffusion. Allowed the opportunity to nominate a producer of their choice, the Beatles opted for Jack Good, the man behind the pioneering British TV pop series Six-Five Special and Oh Boy!

The music recording session for Around The Beatles took place on Sunday 19 April 1964 at an independent studio, IBC, situated just along the road from the BBC's Broadcasting House headquarters on Portland Place. Presented in stereo for the first time, and from the original three-track tapes, are four songs form that session, beginning with I Wanna Be Your Man. Featuring Ringo's lead vocal, the EMI version of this had been recorded by the Beatles on 11 September 1963 - a day after John and Paul had also offered the song to the Rolling Stones. The Stones issued it as their second single (and the first major hit) at the same time as Ringo's version appeared on With The Beatles.

Long Tall Sally, originally recorded by Little Richard in 1956, was one of the songs, comparatively few in number, which made their way from the Beatles' pre-fame stage act into the group's recorded canon. There is one key difference - the absence of piano - between this IBC recording and the EMI version, captured in a single astounding take on 1 March 1964.

Boys, first issued in 1960 by the Shirelles, was not included in the print of the TV special Around The Beatles so this IBC recording is being heard here for the first time. Ringo takes the lead vocal, as he did on the EMI version.

Unlike Long Tall Sally and Boys, Shout never made it from the Beatles' early stage repertoire on to their discs, which makes this Around The Beatles recording especially rare. The Isley Brothers' 1959 original was so long that it had to be split over two sides of a 45, called Shout - Part I and Shout - Part II. This Beatles recording is essentially Part II, with Paul, John, George and Ringo swapping the lead vocal role while raising and lowering the volume in keeping with the lyric.

 

I'll Be Back (take 2)
I'll Be Back (take 3)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)


Recorded EMI Studios, London, 1 June 1964
Producer George Martin
Engineer Norman Smith

The Beatles spent the first three days of June 1964 at Abbey Road, rounding off the non-soundtrack side of the album A Hard Day's Night and adding the two remaining tracks on to the EP Long Tall Sally, speedily issued a fortnight later.

I'll Be Back was recorded from start to finish in a single session. Take 16 was released but the unissued takes Two and Three are presented here. The former illuminates how John conceived his song as a waltz (the Beatles' fondness for waltz arrangement dated back to Cavern Club performances of James Ray's If You Gotta Make A Fool Of Somebody). Take 2 broke down, however, because, to use John's own words, it was "too hard to sing", and it is segued here into Take 3 in which the arrangement has been altered from 3/4 to the 4/4 tempo approaching the master version - proof of the speed with which the Beatles could switch their ideas.

 

You Know What To Do (demo)
(George Harrison)
No Reply (demo)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)


Recorded EMI Studios, London, 3 June 1964
Producer George Martin
Engineer Norman Smith

Two demo recordings taped by the Beatles at EMI the day before they flew to Denmark to begin an inter-continental concert tour.

The drummer on the first few dates of that was a substitute, Jimmy Nicol, drafted in the eleventh hour after Ringo had been taken ill the morning of 3 June. The EMI recording session booked for the remainder for the day was thrown into disarray by Ringo's indisposition; instead of taping the fourteenth and final song for the album A Hard Day's Night, John, Paul and George spent an hour listening to playbacks and running Nicol through some of the songs in their stage repertoire. Then, after the drummer had gone home to pack his suitcase, they remained at Abbey Road and, during a four-hour evening session in Studio Two, loosely recorded three songs, two of which are presented here. The tape of the session was misfiled and rediscovered in 1993.

Incorporating vocal, guitar, bass and tambourine tracks, this is believed to be the only existing recording of George Harrison's second song composition You Know What To Do. (The first was Don't Bother Me, issued on With The Beatles in 1963.) George did not contribute any songs to the albums A Hard Day's Night and Beatles For Sale and then added two to the next, Help!, but You Know What To Do never resurfaced and has remained unissued until now.

With greater application extended during a session on 30 September 1964, John Lennon's No Reply was issued, on the album Beatles For Sale, but this 3 June demo recording of the song certainly has not been heard before. It was announced at the time that John was giving No Reply to Tommy Quickly, another of Brian Epstein's artists, and - as John sings it in a staccato, jaunty style more typical of Quickly's than his own - it's feasible that this demo was recorded with that donation in mind. (All the same, if he recorded it all, quickly never issued his version.) Intriguingly, a drummer is evident, even though no recognised player - neither Ringo nor Jimmy Nicol - was present.

 

Mr. Moonlight (takes 1 and 4)
(Johnson)
Leave My Kitten Alone (take 5)
(John/Turner/McDougal)


Recorded EMI Studios, London, 14 August 1964
Producer George Martin
Engineer Norman Smith

In keeping with the frantic pace of events in 1964, sessions for Beatles For Sale, the group's second album of the year and their fourth so far, had to be woven between US and British tour commitments.

A Hard Day's Night had featured 13 new songs from John and Paul but Beatles For Sale ran only to eight - the six remaining numbers were cover versions, refugees from an earlier era, when the Beatles' nightly performances in Liverpool and Hamburg required a repertoire of no little length and breadth. So, after completing Baby's In Black and I'm A Loser, two new Lennon-McCartney songs that were ready to be recorded, the Beatles turned back the calendar to mine a couple of their old R&B favourites. Both featured searing John Lennon lead vocals.

First issued in 1962 by Dr. Feelgood and the Interns, Mr. Moonlight was the first. The version on Beatles For Sale was a remake, taped at EMI on 18 October, but four unreleased takes were recorded on 14 August, and a combination of One and Four is presented here. The first broke down after John's laudable attempt at the shouted introduction. "Nearly!" commented Paul, a wry smile in his voice, as he encouraged his band mate to have another crack at it. Take 4, only the second complete run-through, lacked the organ track that distinguished the October remake, but George's guitar solo in the bridge proves that experimentation with new and different sounds was now a definite quest.

It was at ten o'clock, when Abbey Road regulations stated that sessions were supposed to end, that the Beatles began Leave My Kitten Alone. This had been a 1959 R&B hit for Little Willie John, covered in 1960 by Johnny Preston, both versions entering the Billboard US Hot 100 in January 1961. The Beatles taped five takes of Leave My Kitten Alone before deciding that the last was the best and so adding overdubs ... but that's where they left it. The recording was never mixed down for release on Beatles For Sale and was destined to remain unissued for more than 30 years - until now.

 

No Reply (take 2)
(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)


Recorded EMI Studios, London, 30 September 1964
Producer George Martin
Engineer Norman Smith

Almost four months after the song had been recorded in demo form, the Beatles returned to No Reply and taped a definitive version, Take 8, for Beatles For Sale. Presented here, as balance engineer Norman Smith announced, is Take 2, unreleased, which underlines the more dramatic, bluesy style that John perhaps meant for his song. Laughter ensured that this particular take could not have been used, but it was clearly an important stepping-stone to the master version, John concluding "Well, we just found out what to do, anyway - it's good!"

 

Eight Days A Week (sequence, takes 1, 2 and 4)
Eight Days A Week (complete, take 5)

(John Lennon, Paul McCartney)


Recorded EMI Studios, London, 6 October 1964
Producer George Martin
Engineer Norman Smith

Proven by the original session tape, the Beatles used Abbey Road as a creative workshop during the recording of Eight Days A Week. A sequence of unreleased, incomplete outtakes - takes 1, 2 and 4 - have been assembled for this compilation, illustrating the different approaches the Beatles considered for the song's intro. Take 5, complete, features a vocal harmony ending, whereas the master version (Take 13) started and finished with guitar.

 

Medley: Kansas City/Hey-Hey-Hey-Hey! (take 2)
(Leiber[lyrics]/Stoller[music]; Penniman)


Recorded EMI Studios, London, 18 October 1964
Producer George Martin
Engineer Norman Smith

Seeking to complete Beatles For Sale, the Beatles scheduled the penultimate session for the album on Sunday 18 October 1964, having motored south from their Friday-night concert engagement in Hull and before returning north for a Monday booking in Edinburgh. In this one session the group started and finished Kansas City/Hey-Hey-Hey-Hey!, I'll Follow The Sun, Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby, Rock And Roll Music, Words Of Love and (not an album track but their next single) I Feel Fine, and they also re-made Mr. Moonlight and completed Eight Days A Week. All in just nine hours.

As the title suggests, Kansas City/Hey-Hey-Hey-Hey! - which the Beatles had performed in Kansas City only a month earlier - was a medley of two songs, Kansas City and Hey-Hey-Hey-Hey! Little Richard, who composed the latter, first coupled them in 1959. With Paul singing lead vocal, the Beatles captured the song in two takes - the master, on Beatles For Sale, was Take 1; Take 2 is issued here for the first time.

- Mark Lewishon sleevenotes of "Anthology 1" album


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